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How we harvest our calendula and chamomile

Posted by John Murray on
How we harvest our calendula and chamomile

Since they were first sown in April and May, our crops of calendula, Roman chamomile and German chamomile have taken wonderfully in the herb garden at Modern Botany HQ, helped along by the sunny weather we’ve seen in West Cork. 

 

We practised effective weed management in the weeks following the sowing with anti-invasive means, to avoid chemical alternatives.Since then, the weeding has been overseen by our co-founder John Murray on his hands and knees – it’s not an easy job, but a remarkably rewarding one.

He and Dr. Simon Jackson pick the calendula flowers by hand, and the chamomile varieties with a comb or a rake. Once collected, any weeds are taken out, and then the flowers are placed in ventilation trays and moved into our dryer, made especially for the purpose by our local, retired Engineering lecturer, Adrian. 

 

It takes a day and a half or so for the flowers to completely dry. Together, the pair make sure there is no sign of moisture, as this would render the plant unusable. Finally, the team sends the harvest to our manufacturing partner, who then infuses the flowers in baths of a high-grade sunflower oil, ready for use. 


Read our last blog to discover more on our regenerative farming methods. 


Shop the collection below. 

Since they were first sown in April and May, our crops of calendula, Roman chamomile and German chamomile have taken wonderfully in the herb garden at Modern Botany HQ, helped along by the sunny weather we’ve seen in West Cork. 

 

We practised effective weed management in the weeks following the sowing with anti-invasive means, to avoid chemical alternatives.Since then, the weeding has been overseen by our co-founder John Murray on his hands and knees – it’s not an easy job, but a remarkably rewarding one.

He and Dr. Simon Jackson pick the calendula flowers by hand, and the chamomile varieties with a comb or a rake. Once collected, any weeds are taken out, and then the flowers are placed in ventilation trays and moved into our dryer, made especially for the purpose by our local, retired Engineering lecturer, Adrian. 

 

It takes a day and a half or so for the flowers to completely dry. Together, the pair make sure there is no sign of moisture, as this would render the plant unusable. Finally, the team sends the harvest to our manufacturing partner, who then infuses the flowers in baths of a high-grade sunflower oil, ready for use. 


Read our last blog to discover more on our regenerative farming methods. 


Shop the collection below.

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